What Businesses are missing in their Company Culture

What Businesses are missing in their Company Culture

We had the chance to speak to Jenna Bayuk, founder of Kinship Kollective, who shared her motivation behind starting Kinship Kollective, her valuable thoughts on why execution-focused consulting with heart is the only way to truly provide support to entrepreneurs, the challenges she faced on her journey to entrepreneurship, followed by her first-hand experience in working with struggling entrepreneurs and the way she navigates them to their success.

Jenna Bayuk, founder of Kinship Kollective, the business support service, has over 15 years’ of experience from business development, marketing, events, to talent acquisition and operations. She has invaluable experience and knowledge that she has gathered whilst working with multiple fast-growth, fast-paced tech startups across the globe.


How will you describe our journey with over 15 years of experience in business development and many other operations, and working with multiple fast-growth, fast-paced tech startups across the globe?

I would compare it to a rollercoaster!  There have been lots of ups, downs, and in-betweens but overall it’s been an amazing ride. Hindsight is always 20/20. Looking back, I can see how all the moments that I felt not smart enough, or that the pressure was too much, or the moments of immense gratitude all shaped who I am today, who I work with, and my understanding of what lights me up so that I can bring that passion to the people around me. 


What was your motivation behind starting Kinship Kollective? And what are you hoping to achieve through the work you do?

Initially, it was about taking everything I had done in my career and leveraging that in a way that was impactful for entrepreneurs. I knew I had a diverse skill set, and the right mindset to create a set of services that would add meaningful impact to them and their business. The key piece for me was that I got to choose who I work with, ensure the alignment of our values, and ensure I was as committed to their vision as they were. As Kinship Kollective gained some traction, it solidified any doubt I had about what I was trying to create which allowed me to expand my vision of what this all meant.  At the end of the day, I love seeing things come to life and being a part of that build from vision to reality. The focus is to continue that through both the Business and Individual Excellence programs. As the Kinship team grows, my blue sky vision is to focus on Legacy & Philanthropic initiatives with entrepreneurs within their companies and outside of that leave a lasting impact within their communities and more.


Since you are very passionate about your work, why do you think that execution-focused consulting with heart is the only way to truly provide support to entrepreneurs?

From my perspective, it is truly tough to add value if there’s no alignment from deeper than a surface-level agreement. Entrepreneurs generally have a much higher risk tolerance that most, in terms of risking it all – to achieve it all. They need people around them where there’s a high degree of trust and accountability to help make it all happen! They can’t do it all, nor do they have the skill set to do all leadership roles well, so advising them on ‘what to do vs ‘I will make it happen is very different. Having been through the rollercoaster of high growth, the intensity of that journey allows insight and ability that not everyone has experienced. It also creates a space of truth, this might not work – if it doesn’t, we may fall flat on our faces, but we will rebuild and come back stronger and better for it! That’s a special dynamic.

What Businesses are missing in their Company Culture

What were the challenges you faced on your journey to entrepreneurship? And what factors helped in overcoming those challenges?

I think with any idea, the toughest critic you have to overcome is yourself. Deciding to take that leap and risk failure tests your ability to work through and persevere through self-doubt.  This is where doing the personal work I feel is a must, if you haven’t worked through your own “stuff” it will come out in ways you didn’t expect and potentially cause less-than-ideal outcomes in certain situations. That being said, I’m a big self-care advocate. Therapy, meditation, fitness, and courses/reading, to expand your self-awareness and abilities is a complete game changers!  Ensuring self-care is a daily practice is a non-negotiable. 


How was your first-hand experience in working with struggling entrepreneurs and how did you navigate them to their success today?

Growing up I was always quite competitive, I liked being challenged, and a thrived under pressure.  I didn’t realize that it would be the thing that entrepreneurs responded well to and would turn out to be my superpower. Working with entrepreneurs isn’t for the faint of heart, they have extremely high standards, they are relentless in their pursuit of the end goal/vision, they love to work, and they will push your personal limits because they don’t see limits. From that perspective, it’s an experience and education in personal growth, performance, and boundaries. Through hitting my ‘max’ and burning myself out, I learned a lot. I learned how to get clarity in priorities, delegation, asking for help, and when to say yes, but not now – right now I have to go work out, or I have plans which are important because they allow me space to be my best. This wasn’t easy, but learning to say no and creating boundaries on times that are no deals, is still at times something I struggle with, but I have to tools now to catch those things, reframe, and communicate expectations. 


What specific recommendations do you have for aspiring entrepreneurs out there that will help them achieve their entrepreneurial goals? 

I feel like the younger generations have been part of a time where success seems readily available at the touch of a button or a post of a picture. There’s this illusion that success happens overnight and is easy. It’s not! It takes a lot of work, fails, wins, and lots of iterations to get it right. My best advice would be to create a strong network of mentors, ask questions, ask for feedback, never stop learning, and always do what you say you’re going to do.

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